Category Archives: Personal Story

4/30/15 The Spirit of Viet Nam Is Stronger Than US Bombs

Today is April 30th, a very significant date to the Vietnamese people. It was 40 years ago today that the U.S. imperialist army was forced out of Viet Nam, ending what was known in the U.S. as the “Viet Nam War” and what was known in Viet Nam as the “American War,” a war that marked a long history of anti-colonial struggle in the country and that killed millions in Viet Nam, Laos, and Cambodia.

Colonialists, International Traitors, Think Carefully Before You Take Vietnam - To Lien (1978)

Colonialists, International Traitors, Think Carefully Before You Take Vietnam – To Lien (1978)


Download the audio by clicking here

Tonight’s APEX Express is dedicated to commemorating the legacy of the Viet Nam War on the Vietnamese people – both in Viet Nam and in the Vietnamese diaspora here in the U.S. A complicated history in a divided country, we want to hear the voices of those impacted by the war, as well as those who resisted that war 40-50 years ago.

We will hear a personal commentary produced by APEX Contributor Yvonne Tran, pieced together out of conversations she had with her mother. Then, we have three guests live in the studio to talk more about the impacts of the war and to preview a community intergenerational teach-in happening in Oakland this Saturday called “Spirit of Viet Nam Is Stronger Than U.S. Bombs.” Our speakers include:

  • Thuy Trang Nguyen (VietUnity)
  • Michael Wong (Veterans for Peace, Chapter 69)
  • Armael Malinis (Migrante SF)

And we’ll play some awesome songs and historic speeches that came out in the ’60s and ’70s during the war!

Don’t miss it.

Tonight’s show is also in tribute to the thousands who lost their lives, and are still recovering, from the devastating earthquake in Nepal.

Below is a list of women-led organizations that have asked for support for their long-term responses to the crisis. They are already mobilizing their communities to take action and welcome donations at this time.

3/26/15 Human Rights Work Under Attack, Avijit Roy Vigil, and Sandip Roy

To download this episode, click here

Tonight’s edition we revisit the R.J. Lozada’s trip to the Philippines and bring you an interview with Brandon Lee, a human rights worker who moved from the United States to the Philippines to be with his family and serve the people. Lee is currently being threatened by authorities in the Philippines, and we’ll talk to some of his friends and fellow organizers about how people can help protect Brandon and other activists.

We bring you thoughts from the vigil for slain Bangladeshi blogger Avijit Roy.

To conclude, we’ll bring you a lively discussion by Preeti Shekar Mangala with noted journalist and author Sandip Roy on his debut novel that has already been making waves, Don’t Let Him Know.

Listen to an expanded cut of Sandip Roy’s Interview:

 

COMMUNITY CALENDAR

Krisantha Sri Bhaggiyadatta
Reading and Reception

Visiting Sri Lankan Canadian poet from Toronto makes a rare U.S. West Coast appearance

Thursday April 2, 6:30-8:30PM at Kearney Street Workshop (ARC Studios and Gallery – 1246 Folsom St., San Francisco)

Free & open to the public
Suggested $5 donation (all proceeds go to the artist)
Light snacks provided
Co-sponsored by Kearny Street Workshop

KRISANTHA SRI BHAGGIYADATTA plays on the links between history, Sri Lanka and the Americas, Africa and Asia. He was a broadcaster of the radio show Bourgeois Blues, Bourgeois News on Toronto’s CKLN (now banned). He is presently compiling: A Very Personal English History of the World. His books of poetry include: Transfixed in Twilight (2015), Cheqpoint in Heaven (2005), Aay Wha’ Kinda Indian Arr U? (1997, 2015), The 52nd State of Amnesia (1992), The Only Minority is the Bourgeoisie (1985), and Domestic Bliss (1981). He has read poetry in Colombo, Kandy, Beijing, Port of Spain, New York, San Francisco, London, and Toronto.

https://www.facebook.com/events/764443910319398/

On Memory and Place: Writing Workshop with Manilatown’s Tony Robles

April 4, 11, 17 & May 2, 1-3 PM at I-Hotel Manilatown Center (868 Kearny St., San Francisco)

Join Kearny Street Workshop for a 4-part writing workshop exploring the sacred places where our poetical sense of community blossoms and grows. Guided by Tony Robles, participants will write about their sense of home, sense of self, and sense of place. We will draw inspiration from the works of Asian Pacific American literary elders such as Jeff Tagami, Shirley Ancheta, Al Robles, and others who explore the heart of Manilatown, the heart in exile, and what it means to come home.

https://www.facebook.com/events/1116954991655095/

 

8/21/2014 Traveling to the DPRK

 

DPRK halmoni

Download the full show here.

On tonight’s show, we travel to the Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea — better known here in the U.S. as North Korea.  Ellen Choy, Caitlin Kee, and Steph Lee visited the DPRK last summer as part of the Korea Exposure and Education Program (KEEP), an annual delegation of Korean American activists to both sides of Korea, one year to the north and the other to the south, to build person-to-person understanding.

DPRK w flags

We’ll feature an interview with Ellen, Caitlin, and Steph — as well as clips from a short documentary that was produced by JT Takagi, Hye-Jung Park and Chris Kang and Third World Newsreel.

Ellen and Steph are also part of Hella Organized Bay Area Koreans (HOBAK), an anti-imperialist group of diasporic Koreans here in the Bay Area.

Hosted and produced by Marie Choi.  Marie is also part of HOBAK.

07/31/2014 -Fun(d) Drive! Makana and Kini Zamora


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Photo from makanamusic.com

Photo from makanamusic.com

First we hear from Marie Choi and her interview with Hawaiin Slack-Key Guitarist. Slack-key is a style of playing that Makana began learning at age eleven. Since then he’s won several awards, and his music has been featured in many big-name movies. The guitarist, singer, and composer made headlines in 2011 when he played his protest song, “We Are the Many” at the APEC World Leaders’ Dinner.  Since then, he’s continued to evolve, creating Hawaiian music that speaks to the realities of our time.

We’ll also hear from Kini Zamora, a Native Hawaiian fashion designer on Season 13 of Project Runway!

kini2Community Calendar

  • On Monday, August 4, the International Hotel  Manilatown Heritage Foundation is holding a press conference to mark the 37th anniversary of the I-Hotel eviction which led to the displacement of Chinese and Filipino elders who called the I-Hotel their home. That’s Monday from 12 – 1 pm
  • On Tuesday August 5 at 7 pm, the Dragon Fruit Project holds a celebration of its work at the GLBT History Museum in San Francisco’s Castro District. The Dragon Fruit Project collects and curates stories from Asian and Pacific Islander LGBT communities and they want you to join them for their first big exhibit!
  • On Thursday, August 7 from 2 – 3 pm, join Chinese Progressive Association’s Youth Movement for Justice Organizing at their Rally for Affordability on the steps of the City Hall In SF. Hear stories about their families and struggles to live in San Francisco. There will be guerilla theater performances and more to demand families be able to stay in San Francisco!

8/29/13: Bumabalik: Reporting from the Philippines

[audio http://archives.kpfa.org/data/20130829-Thu1900.mp3]

To download this episode click here.

(Bumabalik translates into “returning.”)

On this installment of APEX Express:

APEX contributor R.J. Lozada is back from the Philippines!

Contributor R.J. Lozada amidst a crowd of protestors at the SONA ng Bayan (People's SONA, or State of the Nation Address). Photo Courtesy of A. Beltran

Contributor R.J. Lozada amidst a crowd at the SONA ng Bayan (People’s SONA, or State of the Nation Address). Photo Courtesy of A. Beltran

 Aerial shot of the crowd that joined the ‘Million People March.’ Photo courtesy of Architect Paulo Alcazaren.

Aerial shot of the crowd that joined the ‘Million People March.’ Photo courtesy of Architect Paulo Alcazaren.

Monday, August 26 drew nearly 100,000 Filipinos in peaceful protest against political corruption and pork barrel politics. R.J. brings us an interview with author Laurel Fantauzzo who participated in the peaceful rally.

Famers and organizers from Hacienda Luisita protest the distribution of lands in front the House of Representatives in Manila. Photo courtesy of R. Lozada

Farmers and organizers from Hacienda Luisita protest the distribution of lands in front the House of Representatives in Manila. Photo courtesy of R.J. Lozada

Land is life. When Spain forcefully took and claimed land from the Philippines in 1521 they created a sociopolitical climate that would birth long-standing systems of oppression, manifesting in everything from political infrastructure to psychology to cuisine. Among the remnants and ghosts of colonization is Hacienda Luisita. The farmlands that belong to natives long before the Spanish were taken, and ended up in the hands of the family of the current President Benigno Aquino III, since the late 1950s. R.J. spent some time with farmers of Hacienda Luisita to learn what agrarian reform can really look like.

Flordia Sibayan, or "Pong," is the chair of AMBALA, the farmworkers union at Hacienda Luisita. She and about 50 farmers and organizers camped out in front of the offices Department of Agricultural Reform. They're protesting the lottery system, and other divide and conquer tactics to disrupt the movement for genuine agrarian reform. Photo courtesy of R. Lozada.

Flordia Sibayan, or “Pong,” is the chair of AMBALA, the farmworkers union at Hacienda Luisita. She and about 50 farmers and organizers camped out in front of the offices Department of Agricultural Reform. They’re protesting the lottery system, and other divide and conquer tactics to disrupt the movement for genuine agrarian reform. Photo courtesy of R.J. Lozada.

COMMUNITY CALENDAR

  • On Saturday, August 31st at 7:30PM at the Solespace in Oakland, RAMA presents this months installment of Go! Ohana, featuring musicians Ben Ahn, Cynthia Lin, hosted by Tim Huey, and Leila Ramanculova. http://www.facebook.com/events/185431461636494

  • On Thursday, September 5th at 6:00PM, Undocu-Health: Healthcare and the Undocumented — this event at the Asian Resource Lobby in Oakland will feature a talk regarding the Affordable Care Act otherwise known as Obamacare, and the undocumented community. http://www.facebook.com/events/203747449792250

  • On Friday, September 6 at 7:00PM, the “Ordinary Guy,” Afro-Filipino Joe Bataan, will be at the I-Hotel in San Francisco for a meet and greet! http://www.facebook.com/events/574934042570084/

5/9/13 Youth voices, “Growing Up Asian in America,” Rod Daus-Magbual and PEP.

[audio http://archives.kpfa.org/data/20130509-Thu1900.mp3]

To download this episode, click here.

On this weeks show:

It’s the KPFA 2013 Spring Fund Drive, so for the hour consider contributing to truly independent media by calling 1-800-439-5732 or 510-848-5732, or online at kpfa.org.

As a thank you gift for becoming a member of KPFA (amount TBD), you’ll be receiving Thanks and Have Fun Running the Country: Kids’ Letters to President Obama.

Essay Winners of "Growing Up Asian in America"Winners of Asian Pacific Fund’s writing contest, “Growing Up Asian in America.” (L to R, back row: Divya Prakash, Nikhita Gopisetty, Joshua Ko, Kavya Padmanbhan, Alex Yang, Jasjit Mundh. L to R, front row: Amelia Ny, Emily Yang, Elisabeth Kam.)

This week we hear some amazing youth voices and from youth educators.

We’ll be sharing with you some of the winning essays from the Asian Pacific Fund’s Growing Up Asian in America essay contest.

PEPISEED2013Pin@y Educational Partnerships (PEP) at ISEED (Institute for Sustainable Economic, Educational, and Environmental Design)

RodDausMagbualRod Daus-Magbual, Ph.D., Associate Director of Curriculum at PEP

In the studio, Rod Daus-Magbual, Associate Director of Curriculum at Pin@y Educational Partnerships (PEP) in the studio with us, and for the hour, we’ll be discussing youth and education:  From the work that PEP does to inspire their students, and be inspired by them, to more ethnic studies courses in high schools, to building the next generation of teachers–the terrain is vast and there’s a lot to cover.

COMMUNITY CALENDAR

  • On Friday and Saturday, May 10 and 11, Queer Rebels present SPIRIT: A Century of Queer Asian Activism. From the Asian avant-garde to 1960’s activists, Angel Island poets to Slam champions, the Queer Asian Diaspora comes alive through performance, films, and a panel discussion in this three-part extravaganza. https://www.facebook.com/events/187766414706008/

  • On Saturday, May 11 A History of the Body, a new play by Aimee Suzara. A History of the Body brings together text, dance, and visual projections that explore themes of decolonization, and beauty when three Filipina women meet in a beauty salon. For tickets: http://www.eventbrite.com/event/5679044174/efblike
  • The Crumbles, an indie rock slice-of life feature and winner of the Audience Award for Best Narrative Feature at the 2012 San Francisco International Asian American Film Festival (now CAAM Fest), screens at the Roxie Theatre on Saturday at multiple times. The cast and crew will be in attendance. https://www.facebook.com/events/448017581948589/

  • Have you wondered what we do to bring you our show every week? Well on Saturday, May 11 at noon at the KPFA studio, APEX Express and the Unpaid Staff Organization of KPFA present Behind the Curtain: How Great Radio is Made. Learn how we produce our weekly magazine-style show and find out how you can join the APEX Express collective. https://www.facebook.com/events/166744520155666/

2/28/13 Kao Kalia Yang and Radiolab’s Yellow Rain

On this week’s installment:


Download the audio by clicking here.

Kao Kalia Yang

Hmong American writer, Kao Kalia Yang

In the Summer of 2012, WNYC’s widely popular show, Radiolab, sought the Hmong perspective on chemical warfare during the Vietnam War, dubbed Yellow Rain.  Producers from that show interviewed Kao Kalia Yang, award winning author of The Latehomecomer, and Eng Yang, documentarian of the Hmong experience post Vietnam War for Thailand.  What would ensue in the interview has been widely discussed, and mostly criticized by Radiolab fans.

Kao Kalia Yang recently spoke at the annual Listen to the Silence conference at Stanford University. Yang also sat with APEX Contributor, R.J. Lozada to express her perspective on recent developments with WNYC, Radiolab, and the Hmong community.

Also it’s fund drive at KPFA, and we’ve been in touch with Coffee House Press, the publisher of Kao Kalia Yang’s award-winning memoir, The Latehomecomer-if you donate during broadcast, you receive The Latehomecomer as a thank you gift!

To listen to Radiolab’s amended segment vist here:

http://www.radiolab.org/2012/sep/24/yellow-rain/

They made four different edits from it’s initial launch on their website on September 24, 2012 to October 05, 2012: first, to add Radiolab host, Jad Albumrad’s context, the second, to remove snickering at the end of the segment, third, to shorten the silence following Kao Kalia Yang’s tearful close of the interview, and fourth, to add Radiolab host, Robert Kruwich’s apology.

To read Kao Kalia Yang’s response she posted to Hyphen, vist here:

http://www.hyphenmagazine.com/blog/archive/2012/10/science-racism-radiolabs-treatment-hmong-experience

To read a much more complete treatment of Yellow Rain that includes the Yang’s perspective, vist here:

http://www.citypages.com/2012-11-14/news/behind-laos-s-yellow-rain-and-tears/

To sign a petition put together by 18 Million Rising, visit here:

http://act.engagementlab.org/sign/18mr_Radiolab/

COMMUNITY CALENDAR

It’s the last week to see KSW & EBALDC’s   CONTINUATIONS: Processing War & Trauma at the Asian Resource Center in Oakland.
Curator Lucy Lin did an amazing job of putting together a beautiful & thought-provoking show that examines the deeply personal & continuing impact of organized conflict.
Featuring the works of artists Natalia Anciso, Binh Danh, Bessma Khalaf, John Jota Leaños, Gabby Miller, Geri Montano, Nguyen Phuong Linh, Lordy Rodriguez, Tina Takemoto, & Wafaa Yasin.
Join us for the closing reception, War Gastronomy: Recipes of Relocation on Friday, March 1, 5-8 PM, 310 8th Street, Oakland.
Presented by artists Justin Hoover and Chris Treggiari, this performance/participatory work prepares and serves food from a sustainable, mobile kitchen. Dishes served from the cart are from recipes contributed by people who have shared their personal stories of dislocation due to war and conflict.
Also as part of the reception, KSW is excited to announce a screening of Iranian film, The White Meadows, from 5-6:30 PM.
Presented by Santhosh Daniel, Director of Programs at the Global Film Initiative. Directed by Mohammad Rasoulof,this dreamlike yet earthbound film draws firsthand on the challenges faced by Iranian artists of today. It serves as a gorgeous allegory of intolerance, brutality, and mystified routine that resonates far beyond any one state’s borders.
Get down with the Hyphen Hoedown! To celebrate the release of Issue 26: The South, we will be serenaded Southern-style by famed country crooner Toshio Hirano, and we’ll get down to the blues sensibilities of guitarist and singer Wilson Wong. Beer, wine, sangrias and champagne will be provided alongside San Francisco’s favorite Brenda’s French Soul Food and delectable treats by Jade Chocolate.  Southern attire encouraged!Tickets
Early bird $12 (’til 2.28.13) l GA $15 l At the door $20
Purchase tickets now: http://hyphenhoedown.eventbrite.com/

Time & Date
Saturday, March 2 l 9pm – 1am

Where
Gallery and Bar 4N5 l 863 Mission St., San Francisco, CA 94103
21+ l Alcohol will be served at the bar, cash only 

Balay or Bahay: House/Home in Tagalog, Ilocano and Visayan
Doors open at 3 pm, program starts at 3:30 pm, Eastside Arts Alliance, Oakland.
http://www.facebook.com/events/251444658320984/
A group of nine Anakbayan East Bay members and solidarity allies spent December traveling through Luzon and Mindanao on an Exposure Trip to learn about the struggles and organizing of Filipinos fighting for liberation. Everywhere we traveled, thekasamas in the Philippines told us about their struggle for home.From Anakpawis members in urban poor squatter communities, to peasants in Hacienda Luisita struggling to create collective farms, to Typhoon Pablo victims, to political prisoners and minnning and logging communities, they were all struggling for the self-determination and liberation of home and land. This has been constant struggle for the Filipino people since Spanish colonialism.

This struggle is very close to the hearts of the Anakbayan East Bay delegation members. As Oakland residents, we are constantly fighting gentrification for space. Members of the delegation do work around housing, environmental justice, urban youth organizing, reproductive justice and workers rights issues. But the core of all of our work is building safe and just communities for low-income people of color here in the East Bay.

We came back to the Oakland with a dream of building solidarity for the liberation of home and land from Oakland to Manila, Luzon to Mindanao. Please join us for a report back to help make that dream real. Hear our stories, see our photos and video, share food, donate to the victims of Typhoon Pablo and peasants in Hacienda Luisita struggling to take back land and learn about other ways to support this movement.

The event will be livestreamed at http://bit.ly/ABEBLive. This venue is wheelchair accessible. Please RSVP on the wall if you have childcare needs.