Call to Action for Ny Nourn


Greetings, my name is Danny Thongsy I am a Yuri Kochiyama Fellow at Asian Americans Advancing Justice/Asian Law Caucus. I am deeply inspired by Ny Nourn. Her strength and resilience speaks to the spirit she carried which defied so many odds and obstacles. The trajectory of her life – migration-school-prison-detention/deportation pipeline – disclosed the results of our nation’s militarism/capitalism and its failure to help immigrants and disadvantaged members within our community. Her life has raised so much awareness regarding this and domestic violence issue.

Ny Nourn (center)

I can empathize with Ny, being a child refugee of parents who escaped war and the Khmer Rouge genocide only to resettled in an impoverished setting, and I only imagine how difficult it truly was for her and her family; in addition, to the trauma of war she and her family carried and the challenges of acculturation. Also, as a young lady she was shackled in an abusive relationship with a man who is older than she is and to escape seems detrimental. As a results of this toxic relationship  she was later accused by our failing criminal justice system for a crime her abuser committed and then she was branded with a prison number and given a life sentence.

However, regardless of her circumstance, after a decade and numerous years of being warehoused and separated from her family and her community, she persevered and attained her freedom but only to face, once again, a threat of being  separated from her family and her community through deportation. The question is: when is enough enough especially for a domestic violence survivor who served an unjust sentence for a crime her abuser committed and all she wants is to forgive him, bring healing to her community, and be reunited with her family.

Once again as she perseveres through this challenge, we at the Asian Law Caucus and other organizations and community groups are supporting her by advocating for her release.  

By Danny Thongsy, Yuri Kochiyama Fellow
#FREENYNOURN

Yuri Kochiyama Fellow Danny Thongsy with Ny’s Attorney, Anoop Prasad.

8/10/17 After the I-Hotel

Tony Robles at the 40th anniversary of the I-Hotel eviction


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Tonight, we reflect back on lessons from the Fall of the International Hotel and organizing against gentrification and displacement today.

  • First we hear from Tony Robles, writer, activist, and president of the board of directors of the Manilatown Heritage Foundation. This segment was produced by Ikino Kubo and Sarah Lee.
  • We also hear from Angelica Cabande who continues the fight for working people in South of Market where many of the Filipino I-Hotel residents moved to
  • And we talk with Raquel Redondiez, project manager of the new SOMA Pilipinas Cultural District. And Gina Rosales will talk about the new night market launching this month in the neighborhood.

SOMCAN worked with Trinity Plaza Tenants Association to preserve 366 units of rent controlled housing.

Tonight we have a guest host, co-owner of Arkipelago Books, former KPFA apprentice, and music superstar, Golda Supanova! And we have a special call to action by Yuri Kochiyama Fellow Danny Thongsy.

Community Calendar

Friday at 8:30 a.m. people will pack the court to show support for Ny Nourn.

Granny Cart Gangstas show opened tonight and runs Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. at Bindlestiff Studio with a matinee at 5 p.m. on Saturday.

The 24th Annual Pistahan Parade and Festival is this weekend at Yerba Buena Gardens.

New Filipino Cinema 2017, a showcase of independent films from the Philippines opens on August 17 at YBCA.

The Undiscovered Creative Night Market launches on August 18!

7/20/17 Healing


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Tonight’s theme is holistic healing. How do different forms of healing—traditional, cultural or borrowed—serve us? What challenges do they face in a Western world?

  • We talk with Khanh Hoa Nguyen and the Asian American Pacific Islander Health Research Group on the research process for From Mothers to Motherstheir new cookbook of Asian recipes for postpartum mothers.
  • We also talk with Elokin Orton-Cheung, founder of Shooting Star Botanicals, about the healing power of plants and her efforts to decolonize herbalism.
  • And Quincy Surasmith from the podcast Asian Americana, asks questions about self-determination in health and economic sustainability. He talks to both farmers and consumers involved in an Asian American, community-supported, agricultural program called Roots CSA.

Community Calendar
Next Thursday, Housing Now! is hosting a statewide day of action to stop speculation and displacement. A two-part action takes place in San Francisco at the McDonald’s on 235 Front St. Meet there next Thursday at 4 p.m. for protest and again at 5:30 p.m. for community education and organizing.

8/13/17 Beats of Resistance, Culture & Solidarity



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Today you will hear sounds of resistance and culture across the genres produced by Asian and Pacific Islander communities worldwide. In this show we will feature sounds of West Papuan resistance against Indonesian repression, sounds from the indigenous communities of Mindanao (Philippines), Dalit rapper Sumeet Samos from India singing about caste oppression, culture of resistance and drumming in Korea, and more, with hosts DJ Baagi and Natasha Harden.
Community Calendar
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7/6/17 South Asia Spotlight on #NotInMyName #NehaRastogi

On our bi-monthly South Asia spotlight, we highlight two critical issues – the #Notinmyname campaign that has gone viral in India in the aftermath of a series of brutal lynchings and murders of Muslims and Dalit communities in India. And we have an update from closer home here in California – the #NehaRastogi case and the pernicious issue of #domesticviolence and how it specifically impacts of immigrant women of color.

 

To listen to the full interview discussion with Zakia Afrin from Maitri (second half of the show), click on this link.

6/29/17 Asian Americans and Spirituality



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Spirituality is an important source of both resistance and renewal. However, Asian and Asian Americans often compartmentalize themselves when engaging in spirituality especially within religious communities in the U.S. Gender, sexuality, and cultural histories are often erased to find belonging in spiritual communities. As a result, spirituality can be hard to access for Asian and Asian Americans communities when our full selves are not involved. We will be exploring the factors that contribute to these spiritual barriers and what our communities are doing to find places of healing and resistance.

More information on our guests and their work here:

Thanks to guest producers Ikino Kubo, Sarah Lee, and Samir Shrestha.

Community Calendar

Tomorrow from 9AM-5PM, Bay Resistance will be phone banking to Defend Our Healthcare at Senior & Disability Action, 1360 Mission St. Suite 400 in San Francisco. Please RSVP on their website.

This Saturday at 3 p.m., East Wind Books of Berkeley is hosting a lecture by Dr. Kelly Fong and Dr. Clement Lai called ‘What’s On Your Meat Pie?: Exploring Chinese American Homestyle Foodways Through Community Cookbooks.

And save the date! On August 12, Network on Religion and Justice host their “Rise Up” day-long conference and community gathering focused on healing and resistance. “Like” NRJ’s facebook group to stay updated for registration for this conference.

6/22/17 Asian Americans in the Literary World



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Tonight, we take a break from our screens and go analogue. We’re talking books, book stores, writing, and zines: Asian Americans and the literary world. We hear from Golda Sargento and Lily Prijoles, co-owners of Filipino bookstore Arkipelago; two of our favorite Bay Area novelists, Hannah Michell and Esme Weijin Wang; and
Jess Wu-O, artist and the creator of Mixed Rice Zines.

More information on our guests and their work here:

  • Arkipelago Books, one of the only Filipino bookstores in the U.S., and based in San Francisco’s SOMA Pilipinas district.
  • Hannah Michell and her novel, The Defections.
  • Esme Weijin Wang and her debut novel, The Border of Paradise, as well as her creative resources for ambitious people living with limitations, The Unexpected Shape.
  • Jess Wu-O’s Mixed Rice Zines, an exploration of gender, queer identity, and mixed race Asian and Pacific American experiences through comics and zines.

Thanks to guest producers Sierra Lee, Geraldine Ah-Sue, Eunice Kwon and Mari Kakagawa.